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Suddhisukha Translator. Preface I learned about Buddha Recitation at early age as my parents were following the Pure Land path long before I was born. However, throughout the years, I have never come across a book that explained the Buddha Recita- tion method as thoroughly as this one. In order to spare the cultivator questions over how to practice and achieve results, and where to turn when encoun Preface I learned about Buddha Recitation at early age as my parents were following the Pure Land path long before I was born. In order to spare the cultivator questions over how to practice and achieve results, and where to turn when encountering obstacles, I have translated this small book.

Hopefully, it will be of some help to those who tread the Pure Land path, so that, in accordance with their situation and affinities, they may practice and reap the desired results. I will not, in this book, touch upon the advantages or introduce the Pure Land path, as there are already a number of books on the subject. I will instead follow the lead of the author, and directly address the methods of practice. In order to clarify the methods presented by the author and increase the understanding of fellow-practitioners to a certain extent, I have added some words of explan-ation after each method according to my own under-standing.

However, despite all my efforts, numerous lapses and errors are bound to remain. I sincerely hope that spiritual advisors and Dharma friends from the four quarters will fill in the lacunae, for which I would be very grateful. The cultivator is not expected to follow all the met hods presented in this volume, but rather to pick and choose according to his situation, level and circumstances. If a given method does not bring results quickly or is not suitable, the reader can switch to another.

The goal should always be to achieve one-pointedness of mind, or in other words, the Buddha-Recitation Samadhi. Good results will come to those who know how to practice at the right level. Homage to Amitabha Buddha. Suddhisukha Temple of Zen Summer Retreat, Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages.

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Published March 2nd first published More Details Original Title. Friend Reviews. These Bodhisattvas of high rank must all seek birth in the Pure Land, so that they will not be separated from seeing the Buddha and hearing the Dharma and giving offerings in person to the Sangha, in order that they may quickly achieve Supreme Enhghtenment [This is the exhortation of Samantabhadra in chapter 40 of the Avatamsaka Sutra. The word 'Arhat" also has three meanings.

AMITABHA: INVOKING THE BUDDHA’S NAME

First, it means one who is worthy of offerings, as the result of being a mendicant [when he was a bhikshu]. Second it means a slayer of evil, as the result of having broken through evil. Third, it means one who gives birth to nothing, as the result of destroying delusion and afflictions. It also means one who is wise and liberated, one who is possessed Fundamentally, all these great Arhats are great beings belonging to the Dharmakaya i.

They have realized the inconceivable reality of this Pure Land teaching, and so they are called "great" They accompanied the Buddha as he turned the Wheel of the Dharma, bringing benefits to humans and gods on a vast scale, and so they were "well known to the assembly".

There are three aspects to the description of the group of monastic disciples: first, an account of their quality and number; second, praise for their high standing and their virtues; and third, a list of the names of the foremost among them. First, "bhikshu" means a mendicant, someone who has just a single bowl to his name, and accumulates nothing, and relies exclusively on asking for alms to supply the necessities of life.

Second, "bhikshu" means someone who has broken through evil, someone who observes everything with correct wisdom, someone who has smashed the evil of sensory afflictions, and does not fall into perceptions molded by desire. Third, "bhikshu" means someone who is fearful of delusion, who has accepted the full set of disciplinary precepts.

His karma has reached the level of development that he immediately fears delusion. The word for the monastic community as a whole, "Sangha", means a harmonious association. This harmony at the level of inner truth means sharing the realization of the truth of uncontrived liberation. At the phenomenal level, harmony means dwelling together without rancorous speech, with the same joyful intent, and the same understanding, sharing the same precepts and sharing material goods equally.

The sutra speaks of twelve hundred and fifty bhikshus. The three brothers Kashyapa had together a thousand disciples, Sariputra and Maudgalyayana had two hundred and Yasha had fifty. These were all people who had become Buddha's disciples shortly after his enlightenment, people who felt deep gratitude for Buddha's benevolence, and always followed him everywhere. Next the sutra describes the assembly [who came to hear Buddha preach].

There were three groups: first, the group of monastic disciples Arhats , second, the group of Bodhisattvas, and third, the congregation of humans and gods.


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Why are the monastic disciples put first? Because they had left behind worldly forms, because they always accompanied the Buddha, and because the Buddha Dharma depends on monks and nuns to spread it. Why are the Bodhisattvas placed in the middle? Why are the humans and gods placed last?

Taming the Monkey Mind--A Guide to Pure Land Practice

Because they have worldly form, because they were a mixed lot, including both ordinary people and sages, and because their role is to protect the Buddha from the outside. The place name "Shravasti" in Sanskrit means "hearing thing It was the name of a great kingdom in India, and also of its main city, the capital of King Prasenajit [during the time of Sakyamuni Buddha].

A senior minister of the king, Sudatta, was also called Anathapindika which means "Benefactor of Widows and Orphans". Anathapindika paid for Prince Jeta's garden in gold, and donated it to Buddha and his monks. Prince Jeta was very moved, and donated the trees and another parcel of land. Thus the double name [for the site where Buddha preached the sutra]: "the Garden of Jeta and Anathapindika". The introductory portion of the Amitabha Sutra first reveals the time and place of the Dharma assembly at which it was expounded, and then describes the assembly of those who were present. This section opens the assembly where the Pure Land doctrine was taught.

They are the words of Ananda [the Buddha's personal assistant], who recorded the sutra. The essence of the mind has not changed names from ancient times to modern. If we recite the name of Amitabha Buddha to seek birth in the Pure Land basing ourselves upon the inner truth of absolute reality, we will definitely not go wrong.

When the sutra begins "Thus have I heard" it attests that this is a correct teaching. Absolute reality is not self and it is not no-self. Ananda [in saying "Thus have I heard" as he recited the sutra] had not done away with the false self, and so he still says "I". Ananda's ears produced auditory consciousness, so he could personally hear the perfect voice [of Sakyamuni Buddha preaching this sutra] -- this was like emptiness sealing emptiness.

It is in this sense that Ananda "heard" the sutra. The text of the sutra is divided into three sections. The first portion is the introduction. The second portion is the main body of the text that gives the correct guiding principles. The third portion is the history of the transmission of the text.

These three parts are called the excellent opening, the excellent middle, and the excellent ending. The introduction is like the head, complete with eyes, ears, and nose. I will not, in this book, touch upon the advantages or introduce the Pure Land path, as there are already a number of books on the subject. I will instead follow the lead of the author, and directly address the methods of practice.


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In order to clarify the methods presented by the author and increase the understanding of fellow-practitioners to a certain extent, I have added some words of explan-ation after each method according to my own under-standing. However, despite all my efforts, numerous lapses and errors are bound to remain. I sincerely hope that spiritual advisors and Dharma friends from the four quarters will fill in the lacunae, for which I would be very grateful.

The cultivator is not expected to follow all the met hods presented in this volume, but rather to pick and choose according to his situation, level and circumstances. If a given method does not bring results quickly or is not suitable, the reader can switch to another.

The goal should always be to achieve one-pointedness of mind, or in other words, the Buddha-Recitation Samadhi. Good results will come to those who know how to practice at the right level.


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  8. Homage to Amitabha Buddha. Suddhisukha Temple of Zen Summer Retreat, Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. Published March 2nd first published More Details Original Title. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Taming the Monkey Mind , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Taming the Monkey Mind. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

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